On top of being a demo event, the Sedona Mountain Bike Festival is a place to walk the gravel and look at what new goodies the exhibiting brands have to offer. Since it’s early in the season, some of these are products we haven’t gotten our hands on yet, so we were eager to stroll around and see them in person.

DT Swiss F535

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We tend to see DT Swiss suspension more often in settings that are decidedly XC, given the forks’ 32-millimeter stanchions and carbon crown/steerer options. And we picture them on bikes that are decidedly European given DT’s penchant for remote lockouts. But the F535 is poised to change that, and it's not just some sort of matte-black rebranding effort. The F535 gets 35-millimeter stanchions, massive tire clearance and an overall burlier chassis for all of its 130-, 140-, 150- and 160-millimeter configurations, each available for both 27.5- and 29-inch wheels. But there are some remarkable upgrades under the hood as well. Like the Push ACS3 hop-up kit for existing Fox and RockShox forks, the F535 uses a hybrid air/coil spring assembly, combining the small-bump sensitivity of a coil and the light weight, tunability and progressivity of an air spring. Speaking of progressivity, the compression damping has the unique feature of increasing resistance as the fork goes through its travel. Three stages of increasing damping helps keep you afloat when you’re in deep. And, of course, the F535 is still very Swiss. It's got a few beautiful design elements. Flush-fit plates cover the less-often-needed controls at the crown, and the damping knobs are T-10 screws instead of protruding thumb knobs. Luckily, a T-10 wrench is hidden inside the ‘QR’ lever that locks into the axle. Oh, and one other very Swiss feature is the F535's $1,550 price tag.

Troy Lee Ruckus and Skyline Youth

Most of the functional updates made to Troy Lee's apparel lineup are a year old by now, but when your name is synonymous with style, you've got to keep it fresh. New prints were on display at the Troy Lee booth, including the Ruckus (left) and Skyline Youth (right). Both collections are assembled using Bluesign-approved material. Bluesign is an organization that coordinates the evaluation and monitoring of the textile industry for healthy and sustainable environmental practices. A Ruckus jerseys start at $60 and Ruckus short start at $110 without a liner, while the Skyline Youth shorts will run you $65 and the youth jersey will go for $50.

Osprey Seral and Siskin 8

If you dig that Troy Lee style, but a full matching kit is just too much, Osprey partnered with the iconic icon to spruce up its Seral hip pack. The Seral is the big brother to the Savu we recently tested, but it's designed around a 1.5-liter lumbar bladder instead of two bottles. The 427-cubic-inch Troy Lee edition Seral pack goes for $95. But if that's not quite enough for you, the Siskin 8 is a traditional mid-sized pack with a 2.5-liter bladder, 488 cubic inches of space, goes for $115 and also packs that Troy Lee cachet.

Reeb Cycles

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When Jeff Lenosky partnered with Colorado manufacturer, REEB Cycles, it created the opportunity for a perk that was rare or unheard-of with Lenosky’s previous bigger-named sponsors, Giant and Schwinn. He was able to design and build his own trials bike. And it didn't need to have the mass appeal that would sell thousands of copies because there’s only one of them. What he came up with is a blend of trials and street geometry bolted between 27.5-inch wheels. We're looking forward to seeing the unique antics this unique machine allows J-Lo to get up to.

7iDP Transition and Project Light

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Seven iDP takes an approach to knee protection that we believe will soon become the standard. More specifically, its approach to fit and retention. Instead of more and tighter straps, most of Seven iDP's joint-protection offerings rely on more surface area to help them stay put. The material around the pad extends from mid-calf to well up the thigh. There are full-on, full-coverage options like the Project and slightly more minimal Sam Hill knee, but if you want something you'll probably wear for your whole ride, the Transition (left) and Project Light (right) are your new best friends. The Transition is the more flexible option, with a soft shell and a thin, breathable chassis, while the Project Lite notches it up with more durable material and a skid plate on the knee cap. Each features silicone traction prints on the inside and outside of the top rim to help hold on to your skin and he inside of your liner respectively. If you'd rather they not be so grippy on your pearly white thighs, just roll the top edge down and it'll still grip your liner. The Transition goes for $70 and the Project Lite for $110.

100% Cognito, Airmatic and Ridecamp

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Just like knee pads, there's a broad spectrum in protection offered by riding gloves. There are Moto GP-inspired knuckle-dusters, pantomime-inspired hand-socks and everything in between. 100% had a few new offerings on display at Sedona. The Cognito (shown here in red) features a flexible knuckle guard, but hides it under the glove’s abrasion-resistant backing. The material slides across the knuckle guard like a MIPS liner, and also happens to keep the protection incognito, a technology that will cost you $39.50. The Airmatic gloves, (in blue and black) are more middle-of-the-road, protection-wise. They rely on multiple tiny protective panels instead of one large one in order to stay more flexible, and they go for $32.50. On the minimal end of the spectrum is the Ridecamp (light blue and white), which is both a price-point option for 100% at $24.50, as well as being a no-fluff, no-strap lightweight alternative for those who’d otherwise rather skin it.