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Fresh Produce – The Hipster Edition

If you live in Portland, you should probably own these products

Lezyne Digital Alloy Drive

The Digital Alloy Drive sells for $75.

“The most advanced high-volume hand pump.” Or at least that is what Lezyne says about its Digital Alloy Drive. And while it won’t tell you the time or monitor your Twitter feed, it will pump up your tires. The 216-millimeter long, 173-gram heavy pump isn’t the smallest or the lightest on the market, but it does have some clever design elements. Like most Lezyne pumps, the hose hides away in the pump handle when not in use and is threaded onto the end when needed. The digital strip reads in psi or bar with a max of 90 psi (6.2 bar). The pump is also machined aluminum, so you’ll have it for a long time, as long as you replace the batteries.

The Digital Alloy Drive

HT D1 Pedals

The D1 pedal goes for $145 and is available in eight colors.

The D1’s are flat on one side and clipless on the other. Maybe you’ve got a dual-purpose daily driver. Maybe your trails feature some sections you’d rather not be locked-in for.  Maybe these pedals are just the ticket. The D1’s weigh 338 grams per pair and are built around a chromoly spindle. The pedals come with two different cleats included, the X1 and the XF, offering 4 degrees or 8 degrees of float, respectively. Just keep in mind they’re not interchangeable with Shimano cleats. On the flip side, there are nine pins to keep your flat shoe from slipping. The flat platform is narrower than most dedicated platforms, but doesn’t stick out much farther than other trail clipless pedals, so you can lean with confidence.

The D1

Brooks Cambium C13

The carbon-railed Brooks Cambium C13 saddle sells for $220.

Brooks: One of the oldest saddle makers around, top-notch leather that forms to your butt, small streams. Okay, maybe not that last one, but anybody who is a self-respecting cyclist knows the Brooks name. Not long ago, Brooks deviated from the tried and true leather saddle to make a rubber and cotton-topped saddle, which resulted in the C15 and C17. They have now also made the C13. It uses the same rubber and cotton mix of the C15 and C17, but the frame of the saddle is carbon, dropping the weight a whopping 150 grams. The weight drop brings the saddle down to 259 grams. The rail is one piece of carbon that wraps around the entire length of the saddle to reduce pressure points and maximize weight savings. Unlike the leather Brooks saddles, the rubber models are waterproof and thus not effected by dirt and moisture kicked up from the tire. Also unlike leather Brooks saddles, the Cambium is touted not to need Brooks’ signature lengthy break-in period, but it is pretty stiff to the touch. We’ll get back to you in 500 miles.

The Cambium C13 

Pactimo Dispatch 32L

The Dispatch backpack’s MSRP is $135.

Roll-top bags—so hot right now. The Dispatch’s top may roll, but the side is also zippered, offering access in the main compartment. So if you need fast access or a good look at everything in the bag, you have that option. In addition, the three external zippered pockets and one internal zippered pocket will keep everything organized. The pack is built with polyester and has a laminate finish for water resistance. With a 32-liter capacity and weighing 1.8 pounds, the Dispatch might be a functional replacement for your post-ride duffel bag.

The Pactimo Dispatch 32L