Transition Patrol Carbon X01 | $6,000

Because of its super-steep seat angle and supportive, progressive shock stroke, the Patrol is a best-in-class climber. Overall, it has more of a trail bike feel on most terrain than many other bikes in the category, until you point it downhill.

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Cannondale Jekyll 2 | $6,000

Without the Gemini system, the Jekyll is a bit squatty on the climbs. With Gemini, you get more power, comfort and traction than any bike that even approaches the enduro category.

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Mondraker Dune Carbon RR | $7,800

The Dune has a 74.7-degree seat tube angle. This would be steep if it didn't have a 493-millimeter reach (size large). With a front-center this long, it could easily use a 76-degree. It doesn't climb poorly at all--it climbs decently, it just could climb better and the long length can make it feel unwieldy.

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Canyon Torque CF 9.0 | $5,000

The Torque's mild progressivity isn't enough to combat the relatively slack 74-degree seat angle, and you sink into its travel unless you rely on the shock's firm setting. But out of the saddle, it's supportive and efficient, so sprinters rejoice.

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Commencal Meta AM 4.2 World Cup | $4,500

If you can get over the fact that we're actually going to call 74 degrees relatively slack for a seat angle, then thank you, we're in good company and no, it doesn't climb great, but it doesn't climb terribly either. The firm setting is incredibly firm on the Fox DPX2, the pedal setting a bit noncommittal.

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YT Capra Pro Race | $5,200

This is not the Capra Pro Race's strong suit. Although it's remarkable that this big of a bike climbs as well as it does, it's just not competitively efficient, even when compared to the Canyon Torque, which has nearly the same travel figures.

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