YT Capra Pro Race | $5,200

The Capra Pro Race’s 180 millimeters of suspension gobbles up the roughest terrain like a downhill bike. It's more linear than progressive, making it feel more supple and ground-huggy than poppy. It comes to life at high speeds.

Read the full review here.

Canyon Torque CF 9.0 | $5,000

The progressivity in the Torque's rear end comes on slow and steady, and mixes supple, small-bump performance, poppy mid-stroke support and big-hit readiness. Its responsiveness and middle-of-the-road geometry make it ride lighter and easier than its travel numbers indicate.

Read the full review here.

Transition Patrol Carbon X01 | $6,000

The Patrol might not be the most supple bike on descents, but its long, slack geometry makes it a hard-charger. It's composed, supportive, playful, and it begs its pilots to push limits, both on the ground and in the air.

Read the full review here.

Commencal Meta AM 4.2 World Cup | $4,500

Nothing matched the Meta AM's ability to skim across things, unaffected, at high speeds. It was incredibly intuitive and encouraging. Lower-speed-tech maneuvering and descending was good as well, largely due to a not-stratospherically-long reach allowing for easy command of body over bike.

Read the full review here.

Mondraker Dune Carbon RR | $7,800

Big, sweeping turns of speed are the answer here. If you're looking for slow-speed, line-choosey tech where you need to reposition and be precise, look elsewhere.

Read the full review here.

Cannondale Jekyll 2 | $6,000

Short chainstays paired with ground-hugging suspension. If you like steep and techy trails, the Jekyll likes you. I mean, it doesn’t like-like you, but you could be really good friends.

Read the full review here.