Spotlight | Scott’s slimmed down Addict and new Solace


By Nicole Formosa

When Scott’s first Addict hit the market in 2007, it quickly made a name for itself as the lightest production road-racing frameset on the market. By the time Scott took it out of the line four years later, the competition had caught up, and Scott’s engineers had turned their attention to aero.

“We came out with the Foil. It’s a super stiff and super fast bike, and we were comfortable to hold that up as our flagship bike for a model year,” said Nick Balla, Scott’s product manager for urban bikes. “That gave us time to get the new Addict out without just dragging around the old frame.”

Thus, the Addict returns in the 2014 line, and—you guessed it—it’s lighter and, presumably, faster than before. At around 1,000 grams (54 cm painted, with fork this time around), the second iteration of the Addict loses 8 percent of its baby fat. Scott’s engineers also say it’s stiffer and more aerodynamic.

The new Addict SL is the lightest product frame Scott has ever made thanks to a new lightweight carbon fiber weave.
The new Addict SL is the lightest product frame Scott has ever made thanks to a new lightweight carbon fiber weave.

To get there, engineers started with the profile of the Foil’s, and sacrificed some aerodynamic properties, erring more toward lightweight and stiffness in determining the tube shape. The top-of-the-line Addict SL uses HMX-SL carbon fiber, a material that incorporates —buzz word warning—nano-technology with a special resin to reinforce the space between the fibers of the weave. The upside is HMX-SL resulted in the lightest frameset ever produced by Scott. The downside is fancy nano-technology is not cheap, so engineers used it sparingly.

The redesign also allowed engineers to reduce drag by 25 percent over the old Addict, resulting in a 7.8 wattage decrease to propel the bike at 45 kilometers per hour (27 miles per hour). The 2014 frame is 5.9 percent stiffer than the 2007 version, which was achieved by selecting the BB-86 press fit in order to create a down tube and bottom bracket intersection that is the widest of any road bike on the market. That manages loads better, increading pedaling efficiency rather than losing power to frame flex. The 27.2-millimeter seatpost adds to stiffness and comfort.

The Addict SL retails for $12,650 (again, that fancy carbon fiber is spendy stuff) as a complete build with SRAM Red 22 and Syncros RL1.0 carbon clinchers, and weighs less than 13 pounds. Weight weenies rejoice. The Addict is available in three additional models with retail pricing starting at $2,950 for an Ultegra/105 drivetrain.

The Solace replaces the CR1 as Scott's signature endurance comfort bike.
The Solace replaces the CR1 as Scott's signature endurance comfort bike.

Another addition to Scott’s line-up is the new Solace platform, which replaces the CR1 as the marquee endurance bike (the CR1 is still available, but at a lower pricepoint, ranging from $1,500 to $2,100). The concept behind the Solace was to create a bike that is 15 percent stiffer and 40 percent more comfortable than the CR1. Strange as it may seem to ‘measure’ comfort, Scott says it’s a matter of deflection. The seat stays are engineered to work in concert with the seat tube, and by connecting that ‘comfort zone’ to the sides of the toptube instead of the seat tube, the frame allows for 42 percent more deflection under load than the CR1. A tapered headtube and seattube, wider downtube and BB-86 pressfit bottom bracket create the added stiffness over the CR1. Scott is selling seven models of the Solace with retail pricing between $2,550 and $9,500 for the Premium with Dura-Ace electronic shifting and Syncros RL1.1 wheels. Men’s versions come in seven sizes, while women’s specific Contessa is available in five sizes. The Contessa versions are built with a shorter toptube (-10 millimeters) and longer headtube (+10 millimeters) to accommodate smaller riders.

All Solace models have direct-mount rear brakes under the chain stays.
All Solace models have direct-mount rear brakes under the chain stays.