Spotlight: BMC timemachine TMR01

By Kevin Rouse
Photos: Anthony Smith and JP Van Swae

Halfway through the presentation of the TMRO1 at the BMC booth at this year’s Interbike trade show, I’d made up my mind. This thing was sexy. And, as Andrew James, Road Product Manager from BMC, extolled the bike’s technical virtues, I’d also decided that this thing was fast too—real fast.

Lean. Mean. BMC timemachine.

Lean. Mean. BMC timemachine.

BMC’s latest addition to its ever-expanding road lineup, the timemachine TMR01 follows BMC’s introduction of the timemachine TM01 time trial rig last year. Applying as much as they could from the TM01, the TMR tries to squeeze the significant aero capabilities of the TM01 into a road-going package—and a damn-fine looking one at that.

While although perhaps a bit vexing to fans of more traditional forms, the timemachine TMR01 cuts an indisputably bold figure—and backs it up with some impressive claims.

Boasting a 21-percent reduction in drag (at a frontal wind speed of 30 mph) over the BMC teammachine, the TMR01 boasts a power savings of roughly 28 watts, which is hardly anything to scoff at. The TMR01 is also the brand’s stiffest bike to date, with BMC prioritizing stiffness and aerodynamics over weight. The 1140-gram frame weight (56-cenitmeter frame) is nothing special, but the aero benefits and stiffness figures certainly are.

Abrupt, square endings abound on the TMR01's truncated tubes. BMC's signature low-mounted seatstays are also noticeably in the mix. Notably absent however, is the rear brake.

Abrupt, square endings abound on the TMR01's truncated tubes. BMC's signature low-mounted seatstays are also noticeably in the mix. Notably absent however, is the rear brake.

By their very nature, most aerodynamic cross-sections aren’t exactly conducive to high stiffness figures. Accordingly, BMC utilizes truncated aero shapes which happen to vastly improve stiffness—and make the frame UCI-legal. A plethora of ultra high-modulus fibers in key areas of the frame (more than BMC has ever used in its previous frames) is the final piece in the stiffness equation.

As for aerodynamics, BMC certainly did their homework with the TM01, and, naturally, they applied the same lessons they learned to the TMR01. Featuring BMC’s SubA aerodynamics concept, the TMR01 sports truncated aero profiles, as well as BMC’s ‘Tripwire’ technology on all of the tubes’ trailing edges. Accomplishing the same effect as the dimples on a golf ball, the Tripwire surfaces create a turbulent boundary layer, helping to smooth airflow around the frame.

BMC's hinged fork design and DTI (Dual Transmission Integration) make for an aero grille on the BMC TMR01.

BMC's hinged fork design and DTI (Dual Transmission Integration) make for an aero grille on the BMC TMR01.

Component integration was also a key aspect in the aerodynamics equation for the TMR01. By integrating the front and rear brakes, fork, and (rather slick looking) seatpost clamp, BMC was able to bring otherwise independent components into their overall frame design, allowing them to better focus on the aerodynamics of the bike as a whole.

  So flush and so clean. The integrated brakes are of BMC’s own design and offer a raft of adjustability including spring and cable tension. They also sport a quick-release and a full 32-millimeters of rim clearance between the pads.

So flush and so clean. The integrated brakes are of BMC’s own design and offer a raft of adjustability including spring and cable tension. They also sport a quick-release and a full 32-millimeters of rim clearance between the pads.

The hinged-fork design and the integrated brakes were a large part of BMC’s goal “to get as many components to disappear as possible,” James explained during the presentation.

BMC also took advantage of Shimano’s new seatpost-integrated Di2 battery, tucking it inside the TMR’s seatpost for both Ultegra and Dura-Ace Di2 specs.

The TMR01 will begin shipping in early November, in mechanical guise only—BMC is still waiting on Shimano to provide its seatpost-mounted battery for the electronically equipped bikes.

All said, the TMR01 should make for an impressive addition to BMC’s road lineup, and paired with BMC’s new alloy version of their granfondo ( We reviewed its carbon sibling here), the GF02, 2013 marks an ambitious year for the Swiss company. As for us, we’re just anxious to throw a leg over them both.


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