News: 10 Cool Things from Frostbike

By Ryan Palmer

Every year, QBP (bicycle and components distributor, Quality Bicycle Products) rolls out the red carpet and invites retailers and industry folks to brave the icy climes of Minneapolis and get the low-down on a wide range of new products. This year there was snow, there were fat bikes, there was beer. There were also these ten cool things.

Pedro's new Apprentice Tool Kit comes in a really cool case and is stocked with the essentials. $285.

The tubeless-ready Charger Pro SL wheelset by SunRingle sports bladed spokes and a new hub design with seven-degree engagement. They're offered in all three wheel sizes and ship with conversion caps for Front QR, 15, 20 and both 135 QR and 142x12, plus extra spokes. 26-inch: $899 @1,550g // 27.5-inch: $924 @1,650g // 29-inch: $924 @1,700g

Each of the four pawls on SunRingle's new freehub has two teeth, allowing every pawl to engage twice and halving the engagement rotation from 15 degrees to 7.5.

If your bike offers internal dropper post routing you should consider the KS LEV Integra. The cable actuated, infinitely adjustable hydraulic post offers the same function as the popular LEV, but actuates the movement through the bottom of the post.

Press fit bottom brackets suck. In an attempt to make things a little more reliable, e.thirteen is now making BB30 (and PF30) bottom brackets to accompany their cranksets. It looks pretty solid. We can't wait to test it out. $50

e.thirteen's already bad-ass LG1 downhill chainguide gets a stiffer and lighter carbon backplate. The LG1r (r is for race) is due to hit later this year.

The TRSr gets the carbon treatment as well, shaving 20 grams from the alloy version.

Foundry only makes one mountain bike right now, the Broadaxe, but it’s rad and so is their philosophy that a bike shouldn't be pompous, which is something we can surely get behind. This is project-build Broadaxe, is rocking a Whiskey carbon fork and Sram XX1 and tips the scales at right around 19 pounds.

The 3D-weave carbon at the top and bottom of the head tube increases strength and durability. This experimental, naked finish demonstrates the high-quality carbon that Foundry uses.

Cane Creek’s Double Barrel and DB Air shocks are regarded as the most tunable in the industry. They're so controllable in fact, that tuning can be intimidating to even the experienced hand. That's why Cane Creek is putting a lot of effort into education. The DB Field Guide covers initial setup, then gives you pointers on how to observe, analyze and dial in your shock based on your riding experience.

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