My Trail: Stevil Kinevil’s Lunchtime Trail Network

Words: Ryan LaBar

Steve Smith, DeLaveaga Trails. Photo: Forrest Arakawa

Steve Smith, DeLaveaga Trails. Photo: Forrest Arakawa

The Rider: Steve Smith, better known as Stevil Kinevil, began work in the bike business in 1995. Throughout the years, he has worked as a messenger, wrenched in shops, toured the World Cup circuit as a support person, was assembly manager at Santa Cruz Bicycles, drank a claimed 15,666 beers and became the infamous black-block-censored face of Swobo’s “How To Avoid The Bummer Life” blog. Smith’s three-year stint at Swobo recently ended, and he started his own blog—allhailtheblackmarket.com. The topics of Smith’s blog not only plunge deep into the dark muck of cycling’s counterculture, but also cover everything from mustaches to the human condition.

"After seven years of riding these trails there are sections that I've only been able to clean once or twice. The size of the park makes it easy to underestimate how technical some of the spots are."

"After seven years of riding these trails there are sections that I've only been able to clean once or twice. The size of the park makes it easy to underestimate how technical some of the spots are."

Art: Outside of the cycling industry, Smith might be better known by his artist name—the Mayor of Drunkingham. Smith has been creating art his entire life, and has recently had several high-profile shows in Minneapolis, New York City and San Francisco. His artwork has also shown up in the bike industry on everything from tradeshow booths to Bike magazine T-shirts.

The Scene: In an area renowned for miles of amazing riding, DeLaveaga is a tiny blip on the Santa Cruz radar. “All the park users respect each other’s privilege to be on these trails—that’s a big deal,” Smith said. Some of this multi-user kindness might come from the spirit of the land’s previous owner, José Vincente DeLaveaga, who generously donated the land to the city when he died, to share his love of nature with the public.

The Trail: More than 100 years after Mr. DeLaveaga left the park to the city, Smith moved to Santa Cruz and discovered that the trails fit nicely into his daily commute. Following a figure eight from one end of DeLaveaga to the other will yield an hour-and-a-half of flowing singletrack splattered with challenging rocky sections that traverse forests of redwood, madrone, laurel, manzanita and exotic eucalyptus trees. Though DeLaveaga might not be big enough to make it a sought-out destination, as a lunch or post-work ride little can compare.

December 2009 cover This content was originally published in Bike’s December 2009 issue.

See More from the December 2009 Issue

Subscribe to Bike magazine

Subscribe to Bike Magazine's Digital Version

Related Posts:

The Connect

Instagrams - @bikemag