British Columbia Bike Race day 2

Two down, five to go

By:

Day 1 recap video

Words by Harlan Price

Day two of the BC Bike Race, sponsored by Rocky Mountain Bicycles, returned to its annual stop in Cumberland. The course is brand new this year, sporting 84 kilometers (52.2 miles) that has never been used in the BCBR.

At one time called Dodge City, following the tumultuous end to the mining industry, Cumberland has since established mountain biking as its primary revenue stream.

The BCBR and Cumberland’s mountain biking have co-evolved over the last 8 years, leading to a mountain bike mecca and a driving force behind the creation of one of the most progressive mountain bike stage races in the world.

Three years into the BC Bike Race, Riding Fool Hostel owner, mountain bike advocate and course designer, Jeremy Grasby suggested to race co-founders Dean Payne and Andreas Hestler that they stop doing a point-to-point style race. He proposed using the trails in the forests surrounding the town, concentrating on singletrack and cutting out road-transfers whenever possible.

“When Jeremy asked about doing a single loop, my original response was that it wasn’t done that way,” Grasby said. “Obviously it was an idea that was based on tradition and there was no reason not to change the format.”

Grasby’s simple suggestion shifted the definition of what a mountain bike stage race had to be and turned the BCBR into one of the best races in the world. The new course connects two new section trails, Blue Collar and Further Burger.

The start of stage 2 outside of Dodge City Cycles in Cumberland | Photo by Todd Weselake

The start of stage 2 outside of Dodge City Cycles in Cumberland | Photo by Todd Weselake

GC leader Kris Sneddon is followed by his teammate on the trail Bucket of Blood. | Photo by Dave Silver

GC leader Kris Sneddon is followed by his teammate on the trail Bucket of Blood. | Photo by Dave Silver

Leah Davidson has the form to be a contender. | Photo by Dave Silver

Leah Davidson has the form to be a contender. | Photo by Dave Silver

Wooden features are a highlight for many who come to British Columbia to ride. | Photo by Dave Silver

Wooden features are a highlight for many who come to British Columbia to ride. | Photo by Dave Silver

The Sasquatch of Ryder's Eyewear. | Photo by Dave Silver

The Sasquatch of Ryder’s Eyewear. | Photo by Dave Silver

Brett Tippie is MC extraordinaire on the mic or in the bushes. | Photo by Margus Riga

Brett Tippie is MC extraordinaire on the mic or in the bushes. | Photo by Margus Riga

The Race

Men
It may be a dance, but it’s still a competition and the top solo men took it to the line for another sprint finish. Last year’s winner Kris Sneddon officially has a challenger, Tristan Uhl, who took day two’s win. He was followed by Kris Sneddon, Spencer Paxson and Barry Wicks.

Women
Today, Lea Davidson (Specialized Bicycles) missed the top-spot and Wendy Simms returned to the place she is most familiar with, first. On the third spot was last year’s main challenger Kim Hurst (Mud Cycles). Missing from the podium was Sonya Looney, who lost time on the overall.

Men and Women Duo
Catharine Pendrel and Maghalie Rochette finished in the top-spot on the women’s side, followed by Lesley Tomlinson and Gretchen Reeves.

The men’s saw Greg Day and Quinn Molberg sitting in the hot-seat. “We were hoping to stay with the faster riders of the day, but the flat put us off our game,” they said. “We definitely pushed ourselves to get back into position.”

Clear Cuts become meadows as they grow in. | Photo by Margus Riga

Clear Cuts become meadows as they grow in. | Photo by Margus Riga

Cutting Ribbons in the woods. | Photo by Dave Silver

Cutting Ribbons in the woods. | Photo by Dave Silver

Men's Duo leader Greg Day just doesn't tan. He does win though. | Photo by Margus Riga

Men’s Duo leader Greg Day just doesn’t tan. He does win though. | Photo by Margus Riga

 Andreas Hestler (Rocky Mountain Bicycles) has style to spare. | Photo by Margus Riga

Andreas Hestler (Rocky Mountain Bicycles) has style to spare. | Photo by Margus Riga

 Wooden bridges are not something to fear or hesitate on. | Photo by Margus Riga

Wooden bridges are not something to fear or hesitate on. | Photo by Margus Riga

 50:1 is the final ratio. Not sure what it compares. | Photo by Dave Silver

50:1 is the final ratio. Not sure what it compares. | Photo by Dave Silver

Pink ribbons and the BC Bike Race have a long history of keeping riders on course. | Photo by Margus Riga

Pink ribbons and the BC Bike Race have a long history of keeping riders on course. | Photo by Margus Riga

Rocky Mountain has been a long time supporter of the BC Bike Race. | Photo by Erik Peterson

Rocky Mountain has been a long time supporter of the BC Bike Race. | Photo by Erik Peterson

Bus transfers are the preferred method of getting to the ferries. | Photo by Erik Peterson

Bus transfers are the preferred method of getting to the ferries. | Photo by Erik Peterson

Ferries provide a moment to rest and recover. | Photo by Erik Peterson

Ferries provide a moment to rest and recover. | Photo by Erik Peterson

Orca sighting from the dock of the BC Ferry. | Photo by Todd Weselake

Orca sighting from the dock of the BC Ferry. | Photo by Todd Weselake

The perfect end to a perfect day. | Photo by Erik Peterson

The perfect end to a perfect day. | Photo by Erik Peterson

Results
They are still having problems with results. They will apply all new timing tags to all the competitors before the start of tomorrow’s stage.

Previous BCBR posts:

British Columbia Bike Race day 1

Related Posts:

The Connect

Instagrams - @bikemag