Video: First Impressions, 2014 Devinci Troy XP

Stevie Smith can ride it to victory at Crankworx Air DH, but how does the Troy stand up to us mortals?

It’s not every day you see a new 27-inch wheeled bike coming out. Oh wait, yes it is. This “Goldilocks” wheel size has taken the industry by storm this year. We’re not sure who started the fire, but it wasn’t us. All of a sudden there they were, being forced upon us. But, just like we learned with 29ers, the wheel size doesn’t make the bike good or bad. The geometry does. The suspension does. So alas, let’s talk about the Troy:

Wheel size debate aside, the Troy feels confident and capable.

Wheel size debate aside, the Troy feels confident and capable.

Devinci Troy XP

I felt lightheaded and a bit dizzy. Time slowed. Vision narrowed. Temps were hovering around 100 degrees and despite downing a few liters of water in the morning, the heat was getting to me. In my delirious state, with hundreds of fatbikes around me, I was momentarily convinced that I was on some sort of Mars mission, charging ahead to find a suitable habitat.

Then I looked down and watched—in slow motion still—the Troy gobble up the alien-like chunder beneath my wheels, and I snapped out of it. Wheel-size-schmeel-size, this 140/150 bike shreds. We’ve liked every Devinci we’ve ridden since the alloy Dixon a couple years ago, and the Troy is no exception.

Like Devinci’s other models, the Troy utilizes Dave Weagle’s Spit Pivot design, which pedals efficiently, yet provides amazing sensitivity whether on the gas or not. Leaving the shock open proved best to keep traction while climbing the sharp, ledgy rock that scatters the landscape at Bootleg Canyon.

The proven Dave Weagle Split Pivot design eats up trail, yet provides surprisingly good pedaling support.

The proven Dave Weagle Split Pivot design eats up trail, yet provides surprisingly good pedaling support.

Devinci makes the Troy in both carbon and alloy, offering three build kits with the carbon frame, and one in alloy. The aluminum Troy XP comes a with SRAM X7 2×10 drivetrain, Rock Shox Monarch RT shock and Pike RC 150 fork. Serious props to Devinci for slapping that Pike on there; it’s ultra responsive, but rides nice and high in its travel so it won’t compromise the bike’s geometry when the going gets steep. I’m not completely sold on the Avid Elixir 3 brakes for feel, generally preferring Shimano SLX, but I have to admit, I didn’t have any problems on this go around.

I know I’ll like a bike when I don’t notice it underneath me. There didn’t seem to be much of a learning curve with the Troy, it just felt comfortable off the bat. It’s about a degree steeper at the headtube than the Dixon, but the slightly bigger wheels even things out a bit. Compared to the Dixon, the Troy has a much lower bottom bracket which, I feel, adds to the bike’s intuitive handling characteristic. The bike felt playful and maneuverable, feeling a bit lighter than it’s claimed weight of just under 30 pounds.

2014 Devinci Troy XP

At the end of my distorted day, I came off the Troy feeling good, but I only spent a few hours with it. We’re looking forward to testing one for our “Bible of Bike Tests,” hitting news stands in January.

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