Tested: Xpedo Spry Flat Pedals

XpedoTicker
By Vernon Felton

Xpedo Spry
Price:
$80

Xpedo–it may not be the sexiest name in the pedal game, but the company does make a ton of pedals that bear the logos of other, hipper, brand names. In short, Xpedo knows a thing or two about pedals. And then there’s this: The new Spry is a fly weight flat pedal that’s pancake thin and sells for a lot less coin than most. We were intrigued.

The Xpedo Spry debuted at Sea Otter this past season and this pair recently floated into our hands. Here are the basics: The Spry features a decent platform (106 x 100 millimeters), on which sit 14 pins (seven per side). The platform is made of magnesium, which helps keep weight to a minimum. The hollow chromoly axles also lend a hand in that regard. Total weight for a set is 259 grams, which is more than competitive–it’s straight up light. The Xpedo Spry is also nice and thin–at its thickest, the platform measures a mere 11 millimeters. Damn.

Consider this an early review–I’ve only been beating on these things a few weeks, so I can’t comment with any certainty on the durability of their dual- cartridge bearing/bushing combo. That said, a few things have popped up that are worth noting.

For starters, the Spry seems to get munged up easier than other pedals. I’ve ridden flats that look fresher after a half season than these look after a mere half month of riding. Perhaps the magnesium body is simply softer than other mag and aluminum-chasses that I’ve beat on. Hard to say, but in addition to the normal scratches and scuffs, it’s clear that I’ve also put in some serious gouges. Interesting.

Gone, baby, gone. The Spry gave up a pin early on in the game. That's not a huge slight against the pedal, but we also noticed that the platform seems to get chewed up more quickly than other magnesium or aluminum pedal bodies. Hmmm....

Gone, baby, gone. The Spry gave up a pin early on in the game. That’s not a huge slight against the pedal, but we also noticed that the platform seems to get chewed up more quickly than other magnesium or aluminum pedal bodies. Hmmm….

One of the traction pins has also left the building, so to speak. The pedals come with replacement pins, which is a plus, but while I’m on the subject of pins, the Spry could use taller pins and more of them. These Xpedo pins are fairly blunt and short. With Five Tens on my feet, traction was acceptable, but a shoe with a less tacky sole might not offer enough purchase with these pins. I’d also like the Spry more if it featured a traction pin or two in the center of the pedal platform. As it stands, the Spry only features pins along the perimeter of its body.

How will the Spry hold up in the future? Stay tuned for another post a bit down the road.

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