First Look: The New Ibis Mojo HD4

Ibis' all-mountain machine goes full enduro

The latest version of Ibis’ Mojo was first seen last week as practice got underway for the EWS round in Wicklow Ireland. It was a fitting introduction for the new bike, which sees changes that should prove handy for the Santa Cruz brand’s pro enduro racers.

Not coincidentally, those changes are largely based on feedback from Ibis’ enduro team, which currently has the lead in the EWS standings. As you’ve probably guessed by now, “longer” and “slacker” are the operative words when it comes to the new Mojo HD.

Longer, Slacker

Front travel has been bumped up from 150 to 160, but you can run 170 if you want even more longer and more slacker. Rear travel has also been upped slightly, from 150 to 153. That travel is delivered by an unreleased Fox mystery shock–probably the same one Rocky Mountain is speccing on the new Altitude. The frame can also fit a Float X2 shock, which Ibis will offer as an option.

The HD4 can fit a Float X2 and a 22-ounce water bottle. Photo by Dave Trumpore, Courtesy of Ibis

The bump in travel is accompanied by a slackening of the headtube to 64.9 degrees, making the HD4 one of the slacker enduro bikes around. Reach numbers have been stretched on every frame size, resulting in an additional 4 millimeters on the extra small to 34 on the extra large.

The seat tube’s overall length has been shortened and its bore depth increased, allowing for fitment of long-travel dropper posts. Ibis says that almost all riders on medium, large and extra-large frames should be able to run 170-millimeter-travel posts, while most riders on the small frame will have room for a 150.

Photo by Dave Trumpore, Courtesy of Ibis

Stiffer, More Progressive

In addition to a new, stiffer carbon layup on the frame, the HD4 gets new upper and lower links, which are said to be 30 and 40 percent stiffer than the previous versions. The links are backwards compatible with the HD3.

The HD4’s geometry is on the left, with the HD3 shown to the right for comparison.

Higher speeds and harder hits usually come with slacker head angles and additional travel, so Ibis increased progression in the shock leverage curve. Ibis didn’t mess much with the kinematics on the other end of the stroke, though, wanting to maintain the HD3’s pedaling characteristics. Coil shocks are a no-go, due to the clevis yoke extending the eye-to-eye too far for a good bushing overlap ratio.

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We praised the HD3 for not being too slack or too long when we tested it back in Bend, Oregon during the 2015 Bible. That version of the Mojo was seemingly skeptical of the trend towards truly enduro-race-worthy geometries, which resulted in a ride that balanced capability and liveliness in a way that few bikes in the 160-millimeter-travel range can these days.

But that was almost three years ago. Since then, Ibis has released the Mojo 3, which overlaps enough with the HD3 that it probably didn’t make sense to keep both in the lineup. With that in mind, it should be no surprise that the HD4 now looks considerably less skeptical of those enduro numbers. Stay tuned for a full review of the new bike once we’ve had enough time on it.

Complete pricing starts at $4,200 and goes up to $9,400. HD4s will be shipping out worldwide on June 15th. More details at ibiscycles.com.

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